National Coalition of Estheticians, Manufacturers/Distributors & Associations - (201) 670-4100 - info@nceacertified.org

NCEA Positions

Apprenticeship Position (2006)
It is NCEA’s position that apprenticeship shall not be a substitute for theoretical and practical education of the esthetic student in a state-approved licensed school.

Chemical Exfoliation Procedures (2005)
It is the position of the NCEA that chemical exfoliation procedures should be performed by estheticians.
 In addition to manufacturer supplied , product specific education, estheticians shall complete a course of study equivalent to that recommended by the NCEA.
 If estheticians wish to perform chemical exfoliation procedures, they should take the necessary education to include theoretical and practical application as part of their core curriculum or as continuing education modules.

Disclaimer: The NCEA recommends that estheticians abide by Federal, State, and Local Regulation

Continuing Education Credits (2005)
It is the position of the NCEA that all states that regulate esthetician licensees should mandate a minimum of 12 hours of Continuing Education credits (CEUs)–before an esthetician can renew their license.

NCEA’S Esthetician Apprenticeship Definition( 2006)
NCEA considers esthetician apprenticeship to be theoretical and practical training provided by a supervising licensed esthetician, other than in or part of the curriculum of a state-approved licensed school.

Esthetician Internship/Externship Definition (2006)
NCEA considers esthetician internships and externships to be those that are part of the curriculum of a state-approved licensed school.

Laser & Light Therapy (2006)
It is the position of the NCEA that:

  1. Skin care professionals shall be permitted to use FDA approved energy-based devices & therapies for esthetic procedures.
  2. Such use shall be within their scope of practice as defined by the regulations of individual states, where such regulations exist.
  3. Skin care professionals shall meet the training requirements for the use of such devices as defined by their individual licensing board or other regulatory agency.

Disclaimer: The NCEA recommends that skin care professionals abide by Federal, State and Local Regulations.

LED Position Update (2013)

STATEMENT PREPARED FOR STATE REGULATORY BOARDS
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are devices that licensed estheticians should be allowed to use for beautifying & stimulating the skin. When used in accordance with manufacturer instructions they are safe, and do not damage the skin. The range of most LED devices for the intended use of beautifying & stimulating the skin are 410 nm – 945 nm. (nm = nanometers)

LED devices are not lasers.
The light particles emitted from an LED device are scattered or diffused, which means the light is dispersed in many different directions. Laser beams are focused or concentrated. A good analogy would be that of a garden hose. The hose on “wide spray setting” is like that of a LED, and the hose’s “stream setting” would be the beam of a laser.

Use of LEDs, does not require the same safety precautions.
Light emitting diodes are different from laser diodes and are not subject to the Federal laser product performance standard.(1)

LED safety history.
Associated Skin Care Professionals (ASCP) insures over 13,500 licensed skin care professionals in the United States. There has never been a claim or incident reported as a result of the use of any LED device or in conjunction with the use of any LED device.

Marine Agency Corp is a leading provider of professional liability insurance to estheticians and day spas throughout the United States.  Our policies have included coverage for LED (light emitting diode) services for at least ten years. To date, I am not aware of any professional liability claims for these services.

Professional Program Insurance Brokerage insures hundreds of estheticians in the United States. The use of LEDs by their policyholders has proven—by its track record—that these devices have been used safely and effectively by licensed estheticians in the United States.

Reference: http://www.fda.gov/radiation-emittingproducts/radiationemittingproductsandprocedures/homebusinessandentertainment/laserproductsandinstruments/default.htm

Medical Spa Definition (2005)
A medical spa is a facility that during all hours of business shall operate under the on-site supervision of a licensed health care professional operating within their scope of practice, with a staff that operates within their scope of practice as defined by their individual licensing board if licensure is required. The facility may offer traditional, complementary, and alternative health practices and treatments in a spa-like setting.

Microcurrent Procedures (2005)
It is the position of the NCEA that:

  1. Microcurrent devices intended to be used to help reduce the visible signs of aging, beautify and improve the appearance of the skin, utilizing low levels of electrical current in conjunction with skin care products, should be performed by estheticians.
  2. Microcurrent procedures performed by estheticians, are not intended to cause a visible contraction of the muscle via the electrical current.
  3. In addition to manufacturer supplied, device specific education, estheticians who wish to perform microcurrent procedures, should take the necessary education to include theoretical and practical application, as part of their core curriculum or as continuing education modules.

Disclaimer: The NCEA recommends that estheticians abide by Federal, State and Local Regulations.

Separation of Skin Care from the Cosmetology Scope of Practice (2006/2007)
It is NCEA’s position that skin care should be independent from the cosmetology scope of practice and license.

Rationale: Due to the advances in technique, product and equipment, the NCEA recognizes the importance of protecting consumers and estheticians. Skin Care Curriculum requirements should be adopted from the NCEA’s 600 and 1200 Esthetician Job Task Analysis. Furthermore, it is NCEA’s position to raise the level of the Esthetician’s Scope of Practice by increasing the licensing requirements to meet NCEA’s 1200 Hours Esthetician Job Task Analysis. The current cosmetology license that allows licensees to practice skin care includes a maximum of 250 hours of actual skin care training and in some states, as low as 40 hours. Currently there are over 25 states that are still allowing cosmetologists to perform all skin care services regardless of training/curriculum that lead to licensure.

Ultrasound Position (2003)
It is the position of the NCEA that:

  1. Low frequency, low power, ultrasound and sonic devices intended for skin cleansing, exfoliation and product application, should be used by a “licensed professionals.”
  2. There shall be a minimum level of education for the use of low frequency, low power ultrasound and sonic devices.
  3. If licensed professionals wish to use low frequency, low power ultrasound and sonic devices, they should take the necessary licensing education to include theoretical and practical application as part of their core curriculum or as continuing education modules.

Disclaimer: The NCEA recommends that “licensed professionals” abide by Federal, State and Local Regulations.

The Use of Ultrasound by Skin Care Professionals Advisory Notice (2003)
In January of 2003, the NCEA issued a policy statement regarding the use of ultrasound equipment. That policy was based, in part, upon manufacturer supplied information as well as other industry data available to the NCEA at that time.

The NCEA has now received additional manufacturer information that leads us to issue an advisory notice to state boards.

There are three areas of concern:

  1. The increase in the illegal importation of non-certified, re-labeled equipment.
  2. The increase in potentially false and/or misleading outcome claims from suppliers.
  3. 
The usage of ultrasound equipment for phonophoresis treatments which may contravene FDA guidelines and be out of the scope of practice for estheticians.

Use of Esthetician Titles (2006)
It is the position of the NCEA that:

  1. 1. Estheticians reprsent themselves according to their licensed title, as designated by their state licensing board or regulatory agency.
  2. 2. Estheticians must not promote themselves or allow any employer to market them otherwise.

Use of FDA Approved Energy-Based Devices & Therapies (2006)
It is the position of the NCEA that:

  1. Estheticians shall be permitted to use FDA approved energy-based devices & therapies for esthetic procedures.
  2. Such use shall be within their scope of practice as defined by the regulations of individual states, where such regulations exist.
  3. Estheticians shall meet the training requirements for the use of such devices as defined by their individual licensing board or other regulatory agency.

Disclaimer: The NCEA recommends that estheticians abide by Federal, State and Local Regulations.